Reviews of “The Interstices Of These Epidemics”

As I am sitting in my comfy chair, reading a book and drinking afternoon tea, I play the new release by Barnaby Oliver and Clinton Green… [Oliver] plays violin and piano…Green plays bowed metal bowls. With these limited sources they set out to play long-form pieces, and they have been doing so since 2017. As I sit back and do all the things mentioned, I listen to music and feel blown away. On the first piece, ‘The Interstices’, they keep bowing the strings and bowls in a very delicate drone-like piece that works very well with acoustic overtones. Think a bit of Organum or Nurse With Wound’s ‘Soliloque For Lilith’, but acoustic. It is refined and rough and works very well. It lasts nineteen minutes but for me, it could have lasted an hour. It is minimally changing and that’s enough. ‘Of These Epidemics’ is four minutes longer, twenty-three minutes in total and here Oliver plays the piano and Green keeps striking and bowing the bowls. Oliver plays chords, loosely and spacious, reminding of the best jazz works from down under I heard before; think Spartak, Gilded, 3ofmillions and Infinite Decimals but also The Necks, I would think. It’s smooth, it’s a bit of jazz and with Green’s backdrop on the bowls, it is spacious as it roughly edged. As I am sitting in my comfy chair, reading a book and drinking afternoon tea, I play the new release by Barnaby Oliver and Clinton Green again. I get up and just play it all over again. It’s melancholic, it’s sad, and I might think this is the best release I heard this week – Vital Weekly 1250

In “The Interstices” the coalescence of metal and strings produces a series of semi-dissonant, never-too-loud organic stratifications. Imagine David Jackman’s rawer output sounding decidedly more moderate – say, as on an Another Timbre recording – and you’ll have a faint idea of what I’m meaning here. The relative fragility of the pitches enhances the release of specific harmonics from their combination, placing the music in a niche between contemplative mood (always with an eye open) and slight uneasiness.”Of These Epidemics” is strongly characterized by Oliver playing peaceful sequences on the piano, a resonance reminiscent of Pink Floyd’s Rick Wright circa “The Great Gig In The Sky” but with an entrancing repetitiveness à la Charlemagne Palestine. The fluctuation of those chords along the strident mantra of Green’s bowed bowls is uniquely delightful. Without the need of revolutions, the duo’s interaction remains accessible to most everybody. Overall, an appreciably unadulterated work  – Touching Extremes

New album with Barnaby Oliver

The Interstices Of These Epidemics is my brand new album with Barnaby Oliver, released digitally today on Shame File Music. It will also be available as a glass-mastered CD housed in a full colour 4-panel wallet in mid-August (you can pre-order now from Shame File Music for a special price).

In April 2017, Barnaby Oliver and I started recording with the aim of improvising long-form pieces made up of a restricted palette of gestures and sound sources. Throughout the next two years we came together sporadically as we continued this quest, working through various ideas and changing instrumentation. Our work was gradually refined done to what you hear on this album: a combination of harmonics arising from bowed metal bowls and violin (or piano), coalescing into other-worldly music that at first appears static, yet constantly shifts and re-grounds itself.

Debut cassette now on Bandcamp

All the way back from 1994…

This is a free/pay-what-you-feel download, but as Bandcamp a waiving all revenue for 24 hours from midnight on Friday 1 May (that’s from 5pm AEST time Australia), do check out my other Bandcamp releases, as funds from all purchases during this period will go 100% to artists.

Young Women of Asia 7″ lathe cut now available

ywoa 7

The limited edition 7″ lathe cut of Young Women of Asia are assembled and ready to go (order via Shame File Music).

I procrastinated for some time about whether to go ahead with the costly proposition of making 50 lathe cut 7″s to house the physical form of this release. I’m basically selling them at cost, so there is no prospect of me not making a loss on the project. Yet having specifically created the tracks for a 7″ EP release, I decided in the end to commit to this costly project.

Once the lathes were done (by Small Run in Melbourne), I was happy with how they sounded, but it was when the colour covers were complete, with stenciled voids cut into them, that I really knew this was going to be an exquisite object worth all the time and effort.

ywoa stack

The music was created using flexi-discs of Japanese and Pakistani folk music sung by young women and girls as source material, and the cover images cuts up a treasured booklet that came with the Japanese flexis. The physical release intertwines the music and the packaging into what is a unique object.

Limited to 50 hand-numbered copies, each 7″ comes with a download card. The download comes with a bonus live track.

Young Women of Asia

Now available digitally, 7″ vinyl (limited edition of 50 copies) coming soon (pre-order now at Shame File Music):

Clinton Green “Young Women of Asia” 7″/digital – Turntables prepared with misplaying flexi-discs of Japanese and Pakistani folk music, mediated into precise collages of whirling voices and broken melodies. Specifically composed for the 7” vinyl format, available in a limited edition of 50 lathe cut 7” singles, with full colour hand-numbered covers, each intricately sliced for a kaleidoscopic effect, with download code. Digital-only version also available. Download/digital version comes with a bonus live track.

 

If Good Fortune Follows A Fellow cassette/digital

ifgoodfortune

Another new release, hot on the heels of Thylacine. Some intensive recording work over the past year is starting to emerge.

Clinton Green “If Good Fortune Follows A Fellow” cassette/digital (Chemical Imbalance, 2018) Two different sides of recent turntable manipulation/output. Side A uses audio signal output noise from a misplaying “How To Be A Ventriliquist” LP found in Auckland, agitated by layers of cardboard and a suspended fingerdrum. Side B changes stride to a meditative percussive work generated by four turntables arranged with overlapping acoustic preparations. The cassette is a limited edition of 25 numbered copies, each individually packed with a Merz assemblage/lucky dip of objects/detrius collected/constructed by myself and Chemical Imbalance label overlord, Mitch Soden (includes download code).

Order/stream/download from the Chemical Imbalance Bandcamp page. I also have limited copies of the tape available through Shame File Music.

 

An excerpt is also featured on the new Chemical Imbalance Label Sampler #10.